Quantum Pathway

Oil paint and microcystalline wax on an oxidised copper sheet (.55mm thick). Mounted to a 3mm aluminium composite panel with 10mm spacing.

Quantum Pathway is a sequence of punctured holes in either depressions or impressions, which are everything and nothing at the same time. They can be distinguished and linked by the ways in which light reaches their outer edges with varying intensities, bringing life and direction to the vacuum (soul) within.

Inspired by the role that microtubules play for signal transportation in the human brain that creates consciousness. According to Stuart Hameroff and Roger Penrose, the collapse of the wave function in quantum mechanics could be happening in our brain. There needs to be an uncomputable element that does this. Therefore, they postulate that microtubules (protein subunits of tubulin) could be where it happens.

Thus if, “consciousness” is produced when a quantum dispersion of conceivable outcomes collapses into a single actuality. This is like the instant my curled-up copper sheet finally unfurls and becomes visible. Or when I go from three dimensions to two dimensions (proto-awareness to consciousness) in my art. Even though every event took place in three dimensions, reality exists on the flat two dimensional picture plane. The place where we observe its aesthetic value, and all that really matters to the outside world.

See online for other viewpoints and sales:

https://bluethumb.com.au/malcolmkoch/Artwork/quantum-pathway

https://www.singulart.com/my-singulart/account/portfolio/artwork/1963605/share

The dual nature of making marks

Unique interconnections were established on a curved surface from what began as a clean sheet of copper. Now that the sheet is flattened out again, fresh connections emerge from the reciprocating punctures.

The resulting holes are nothing at all, but everything. The degrees to which light strikes their outer borders with differing outcomes can be used to characterise and connect them. Generating an atmosphere that ultimately fills the void with life and direction.

Duality of Marks: 106w cm x 56h cm x 3d cm, copper sheet (relief and counter-relief), mounted to 3mm aluminium composite panel with 5mm spacers. See video of art

Individual marks or a wave of marks?

The art piece shown above has a textured landscape. Created by staining and a network of interconnected drill holes of different sizes. Even if each sculpture mark may seem like an isolated expression, they are all connected. Energy is deduced from the interaction of the puncture marks and shadows as reciprocating emotions that flow in a wave-like manner (horizontally). It is possible to view the expressions as having a dual character, existing both as a mark distinct from other markings and as part of a wave of expressions.

Tapestry of expressions

Malcolm’s curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space – as a sculptor does, his process returns to the ‘flat two-dimensional picture plane’ (the switch from 3D to 2D). When ‘expressions’ are multiplied in this way, they intertwine on the same plane (and the reverse side) with varying degrees of value. However, it is only when the results are unraveled and revealed on the two dimensional flat plane that co-dependent relationships become apparent. Thus generating the human visual experience – a metaphor for how we observe a world that is so much greater than ourselves.

Everything begins curled up

Starting with a curve

The art involves assembling a diverse range of network expressions into a cohesive whole. Therefore, the curve is critical as it provides the medium for expressions. In this particular case, life starts by rolling up a sheet of metal in such a way that the expressions can be networked. See video of the curling up process

Drilling on a curve

The drilling process is like a brushstroke made on a flat 2D plane. There is initial contact, movement across and then an exit off the surface. However, due to the fact that some of these expressions are made hidden from sight and in some instances on the other side (reserve side), the result is unique markings. Often resulting in relief, and counter relief marks, including clockwise and counter clockwise drill marks, along the horizontal line in a wave-like pattern. Hence, why I call this act a ‘quantum brushstroke’. See video of the drilling process

Unraveling the curve

At the point of creation, values are efficiently constructed in a reciprocating pattern. However, until the results are revealed on a flat surface for observation, there is no visual way of fully knowing if the expressions created have an aesthetic appeal – the reality of uncertainty meets the longing for certainty. This video shows the moment of revealing this art piece.

So, if you were to coil the artwork back up, you could follow the corresponding links again. This reminds me of FFT algorithms, which are used in everyday life to power signal processing and picture analysis. Where pictures are continually opened (uncompressed), closed (compressed), and then opened again (uncompressed). Still, we care more about what is in front of us than the disarray of how things came to be. Thus, the spectator’s experience is content consolidation with new clarity rather than the artist’s journey. Nonetheless, it is helpful to know due processes and methods as an artist who must always progress. Based on that interest, the connecting marks in the following illustrations are explained in more detail.

Observing the results on the 2D picture plane

When the expressions made in the curled up state are finally untangled and flattened out, what then becomes visually connected? As an example, the associated drill hole sets are displayed as follows:

Copper sheet with drill holes
The connected set of drill holes (reciprocated expressions) are circled above in white pen. Also drawn, is a side view diagram of the curled up copper sheet. This shows the direction of the drilling into the layers. See video example
A sheet of copper with large drill holes in a row
The drill has now penetrated through to the inside of the curled up sheet. Intersecting two layers rather than the three above (five layers drilled in total).
Further drilling was done on a quarter turn of the curled up copper sheet. The inset diagram shows the direction drilled …
… and through to the inside and then out the other side, intersecting four layers in total. Due to the fact that some of these expressions are made on the other side (reserve side), the result is unique markings – relief, and counter relief marks along the horizontal line in a wave-like pattern. Furthermore, the unraveling process causes distinct spin directions to be evident in the flattened 2D form even though all drilling was done in a clockwise manner. View the notes I took at the Visual Entanglement show at RiAus: Quantum brushstrokes

Conclusion

For an artist who uses curves almost exclusively, the reality shift from three dimensions to two dimensions cannot be replaced by any amount of forethought. As a blind method of generating marks rather than the more typical act of seeing one’s activities, this becomes a tool for assessing and comprehending the state of being in the creative moment, which is basically all about emotion. Observing the aesthetic attributes of what worked and what didn’t typically produces the aesthetic values and appeal that, in theory, lead to aesthetic appreciation and initiate a subsequent phase of introspection or meditation.

Further reading: Science meets Art: Nature becomes clearer to the observer when you compress the depth – RiAus: Biological Membranes – Surface, Undulation And Interface

About Malcolm Koch

Malcolm’s abstract expressionist work is in a style that he calls “Membrane Art”. A working practice that is characterised by mark makings on curved structures rather than on a flat picture plane. The surface geometry underpins the aesthetic of each piece. So whether he adopts paint pourings, cracking, peeling, drilling, cutting, staining processes, etc. It is the practice of allowing the curved surface geometry to play a part in creating distinctive expressions. Before the transformation of flattening the profile. An aesthetic thought that he has been evolving since 2004.

Malcolm’s work has had numerous solo and group exhibitions, including at RiAus (FutureSpace Gallery) which had two exhibitions: Visual Entanglement in 2016 and Under the Surface in 2014. His work is in numerous private and corporate collections in Australia and overseas. He has been a three time finalist in the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize. WNSAP–previously accepted entries

The Copper Project – works on copper sheets

Membrane Art draws inspiration from the interactions between curved profile surfaces to play a part in flat-lying ones.

Membrane Art
An evolving expression

Following shows a process:

The Copper Project is motivated by the interconnection of curved surfaces to play a part in flat-lying observed profile – an evolving expression since 2004, these works are an extension of that idea to copper surfaces

This displays the finished piece after it has been completely flattened out and attached to a support frame. The piece’s interconnected drill holes and staining produce a textured landscape, and each sculptural mark suggests energy through the interaction of shadows and puncture marks. It should be noted that every expression was created on the canvas’ reverse side, emphasising a distinct type of expression that arises.

Creating a different kind of abstraction is born out of a need to sculpturally define our multi-dimensional universe. It shows a world that we cannot observe directly, yet we know it exists. Therefore, the meaning may appear latent but the premise and execution of the artwork is far from it. Like a particle that can appear in many places at once, reciprocal markings appear as unique expressions that provide content and dynamic relationships made possible through the use of a curve structure.

The truth is we are limited by our reality — we remain trapped on the surface of a flat universe. Although, we may try to ‘jazz-it-up’, over conceptualise and garner attention with meaningful issues, it is not what interests me as an artist. Rather, I prefer to allow expression to exist through provoking a different kind of beauty. To allow it to naturally manifest and contradict known assumptions.

– –

Open Gallery/Studio
Mon–Fri, 10am–5pm
Weekends available on request

The Copper Project
Malcolm Koch’s Art Gallery
44 Nelson Street (use back entrance via Malcolm Koch Design)
Stepney, Adelaide, South Australia
Malcolm 0419 864 987

More about my work processes can be seen on my instagram account: Membrane_Ar

SALA Festival 2022 – Entry number 117

The South Australian Living Artist (SALA) Festival is a statewide annual event showcasing a range of artists throughout August. It was established in 1998 to promote and celebrate the many talented visual artists in South Australia. The aim was -and remains- to extend visual arts audiences, and as an umbrella organisation, to have a continued policy of inclusiveness allowing all South Australian visual artists of any level and working in any medium to play a part.

After several years of participation, this year Malcolm Koch’s exhibition will showcase a range of works including his latest series called ‘Double Story’. The idea where one ‘expression’ creates many — intertwined within the same plane and its reverse side — with an equal degree of value. Being able to interchange to the ‘other’ side creates a co-dependent relationship from one to the other which maybe viewed as completing the experience.

That said. Not getting the whole picture in one go is part of the human condition. This work offers a glimpse of the whole. However, we can only observe the work from one side at a time. Therefore, by describing something that’s the same for both sides, regardless of which side you‘re on is a realisation that our inability to engage with its entirety is real. Nevertheless, it is through the inverse (reciprocal expressions) that truth is revealed. That there are two sides to every story, yet, it is all one.

Malcolm's SALA guide entry
SALA guide entry number 117

SALA Festival 2022
1 – 31 August 2022
Mon–Fri: 10am – 5pm

Opening event 7 August (Sunday) 12 – 4pm
RSVP mobile 0419864987

Malcolm Koch’s art space
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises.

Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm
44 Nelson Street, Stepney
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

Online salesThis entry was posted in Malcolm Koch on  by Malcolm Koch. Edit

Double Story series

This current series of work is formed by using the topography of the curved canvas. I apply what I call ‘quantum brushstrokes’ to make structural marks – which cannot be achieved on a flat picture plane.

Close-up of Double Story_No4 in transition to the other side (Double exposured image). Oil on synthetic board.

One ‘expression’ creates many — intertwined within the same plane and its reverse side — with an equal degree of value. Being able to interchange to the ‘other’ side creates a co-dependent relationship from one to the other which maybe viewed as completing the experience.

That said. Not getting the whole picture in one go is part of the human condition. This work offers a glimpse of the whole. However, we can only observe the work from one side at a time. Therefore, by describing something that’s the same for both sides, regardless of which side you‘re on is a realisation that our inability to engage with its entirety is real. Nevertheless, it is through the inverse (reciprocal expressions) that truth is revealed. That there are two sides to every story, yet, it is all one.

Currently, unframed, these oil paintings comes with a framing solution. Please talk to the artist.

One side of Double Story No 6. Oil on synthetic board.
The transition to the other side.
The other side of Double Story No 6, with structural markings of an equal degree of value. Oil on synthetic board.

SALA Festival 2022
1 – 31 August 2022
Mon–Fri: 10am – 5pm

Opening event 7 August (Sunday) 12 – 4pm
RSVP mobile 0419864987

Malcolm Koch’s art space
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises.

Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm
44 Nelson Street, Stepney
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

Online sales

Slice of Life

Malcolm’s curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space – as a sculptor does, his process returns to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’ (the switch from 3D to 2D). Working in this way creates reciprocal and distinct marks as a single expression. An aesthetic that is only possible through the use of a curved surface. So, when finally we observe them on a two-dimensional picture plane a different aesthetic emerges. Demonstrating that past events don’t disappear but an alternative purpose and meaning eventuates in the transformation of flattening the profile from one environment to another – setting in motion a further process of deep reflection or meditation.

In the example blow, ten ‘cuts’ appear on the picture plane. However, the truth is that only five single expressions were made at the one time. So one might ask, how is it that we can now can see ten? The reason that this has occurred is because the surface geometry was in a different state when it was cut, i.e., it was curled-up, so that two layers were penetrated at almost the same time. So, the flattening of the linen as we see it now happened after the event. Hence, how one mark may lead to many.

Slice of Life: Medium – Belgian linen, hand-sized with rabbit-skin glue on the reverse side, 100% cotton fabric colours, mounted to a professional quality frame.

What we observe
The raw linen (front) shows a row of 5 split open cuts at the top with another similar row below them. Appearing through each of the cuts is 5 brightly coloured fabrics, each lining up with their corresponding cuts.

The artist’s hand-sizing (rabbit-skin glue) on the reverse side, aids in turning the split edges inside itself – leading the eye into the open spaces. Also, the broad brushstroke expressions made with the glue on the ‘back’, appear to seep through the linen fabric in places, a process of over-soaking, through to the front. This brings texture and reinforces the human expression.

Close-up of several cuts (splits) in the linen surface. The edges of the linen have turned inside itself. Leading the observer into the space created.

Coming events

SALA Festival 2021
1 – 31 August 2021
 
Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm

Opening event
Sunday, 15 August, 12 – 4pm

Malcolm Koch’s art space
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises.

Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm
44 Nelson Street, Stepney 
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

More about Malcolm Koch

Flatten the curve – the new normal!

Paintings on display in Malcolm Koch's art gallery.
Paintings on display in Malcolm Koch’s personal art space: 44 Nelson Street, Stepney SA.

About
Since 2004, Malcolm has been evolving this aesthetic thought: Creating events on a curved surface then unravelling it to ‘flatten the curve’. Only then is it complete for observation.

Malcolm’s curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space as a sculptor does, his forethought is to return to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’ (the switch from 3D to 2D). Working in this way creates reciprocal and distinct marks as one expression. An aesthetic that is only possible through the advent of a curve. So when finally, we do observe it on a two dimensional flattened picture plane a different aesthetic emerges.

SALA Festival 2020
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See are a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises – by appointment only (to keep the curve flat!).

1 – 31 August 2020 
Monday-Friday: 10am – 5pm
Saturday-Sunday: 12pm – 4pm

Malcolm Koch’s art space
44 Nelson Street, Stepney 
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

More about Malcolm Koch

SALA Festival Program

_ _

Preamble
To me, Membrane Art is an open door to endless possibilities. Heavily dependent upon the geometric surfaces (nature) which underpins it. Yet, in the end, you never truly know what you’re going to be looking at until you unroll it (flat).

Recognising that the surface membrane creates the basic structure for the artwork is only the beginning. Results can either echo, connect and/or entangle themselves in ways that cannot be achieved in our flat dimensional world. It shows that the markings have come from somewhere else. Where expression and sculpture unite — which is why I consider this approach neither painting nor sculpture.

There certainly is a sense of freedom by working in this way. Creating a gestural response that is deeply-rooted in the present context of quantum physics yet not bound by its mathematical theorems, provides an artistic licence to explore.

On the foreshore — Brighton Jetty Sculptures, 2020

I’m proud to have two of my pieces, Close To Water and Quantum Sunray selected to be included in this annual event.

Each year, Brighton Jetty Sculptures, raises funds for the Brighton Surf Life Saving Club volunteers. On display for 12 days, don’t miss out on seeing over 200 sculptured works by many South Australian and national Artists.

Entered under the newly developed category, Relief/Wall-hung Sculpture, I believe this describes what my work is about.

Patritti Brighton Jetty Sculptures
January 22 to February 2, 2020
Brighton Beach, South Australia
Open 8—8pm most days
www.brightonjettyclassicsculptures.com

Close To Water, detail.
Front on view: Close To Water, oil paint on JPP Synthetic, 905 gsm. Floating on silver acrylic-mirror strips and adhered to a 3mm back panel with 12mm spacers, 789h x 1072w x 40d mm
Square Root of an Expression (Quantum Sunray), detail, 824h x 732w x 40d mm
Front on view: Square Root of an Expression (Quantum Sunray), Oil paint on JPP Synthetic, 905 gsm. Floating on silver acrylic-mirror strips and adhered to a 3mm back panel with 12mm spacers, 824h x 732w x 40d mm

You will find my work in the large white marquee. Located on Bindarra Reserve which is on the northern side of the Brighton Surf Life Saving Club.

My artist statement and description of the work: My curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space as a sculpturist does, my forethought is to return to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’. As this reflects our ingrained version of reality – that we are tied to a flat universe yet entangled with all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

A different aesthetic is created on curved canvases

Helium Sculpture (contemplation side): A double-sided painting that can be hung either side. Why? Because structural expressions are made on both sides of the canvas at the same time.
Reverse side of painting reveals my working notes, processes and thoughts
Helium Sculpture (reverse side): This side reveals my working notes, processes and thoughts. Middle right side of diagram: This illustrates how reciprocal marks can eventuate on curled surfaces. Creating a network of emptiness (one expression) that when unraveled remain bonded to the flat two dimensional picture plane.

Curved canvases

Since 2004, I have been developing the idea that a different kind of aesthetic is created when events are deployed on curved canvases. Marks created in this way take on the form of the geometric profile.

The curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space as a sculpturist does, my forethought is to return to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’. As this reflects our ingrained version of reality — that we are tied to a 2D universe yet entangled with all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

I call this approach Membrane Art. As it is the curved canvas surfaces that creates the basic structure for each work of art. Only when it is unraveled and stretched-out does the aesthetic emerge as a network of expressions.

Membrane Art is inspired by the present context of a ‘multi-dimensional’ universe and the way nature itself could be. An aesthetic thought that I continue to evolve.

Helium Sculpture along with 9 other pieces are on display at Little Bang Brewing until August 15, 2019.

Mirrored Space Exhibition at Little Bang Brewing. A different aesthetic is created on curved canvases.

The Quantum Brushstroke

Square Root of an Expression (Quantum Sunray) — Yellow On Silver Mirror. On display at Little Bang Brewery until August 15, 2019.
Square Root of an Expression (Quantum Sunray) — Yellow On Silver Mirror (Catching the light)

In the 1950s and 1960s, with his work on ‘spatialism’ Lucio Fontanta gave us a new concept of space. His gestural expressions of ‘buchi and tagli’ (cuts and holes) called for a new art form that reflected and responded to the current understanding of space and time. Especially with his sharp edge cutting of the canvas, he was able to show that you can extend the 2D object into a 3D conceptual one. His work created an image through the direct engagement of both the canvas’s physical properties and the space that exists around it. In a nutshell — he made us think about the role of the surrounding space. Lucio-fontana.

Rather than the surface exposing time and space. My work ties us to it. Firstly, by creating marks in a 3D curvature construct. Reciprocal and distinct cavities develop as one expression. These marks are only possible through the advent of a curve. So when finally, we do observed the results on a 2D flattened picture plane (the switch from 3D to 2D represents the collapse of ‘probabilities’), a network of emptiness emerges — reverberating as a mirrored envelope, reflecting our ingrained version of reality.

An aesthetic that is deeply rooted in the present context of a ‘multi-dimensional’ universe and the way nature itself could be.

Helium Bloom – Titanium White On Blue Mirror

Exhibition dates: August 1 — 11, 2019

Opening night:
Sponsored by Gatch Wine
6pm, Friday, August 2, 2019
RSVP Malcolm +61 (0)419 864 987

Detail showing the backing mirror reflecting. Photo Jamie Rose Photography.
Detail showing the backing mirror reflecting. Photo Jamie Rose Photography.
Helium Bloom – Titanium White On Blue Mirror.
Framed size 902w x 805h x 40d mm. Photo Jamie Rose Photography.
Malcolm’s reverse side working notes

Malcolm’s artist talk times:
Join me for an informal chat about the work — 
4pm, Sunday, August 4
4pm, Sunday, August 11

Venue: Little Bang Brewing
25 Henry Street, Stepney, South Australia
Thursday 4pm – 10pm
Friday 12pm – 10pm 
Saturday 12pm – 10pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Art exhibition

Mirrored Space

White Helium Bloom (detail), Oil on JPP Synthetic, set off a blue mirrored back panel

A series of work that visualises a quantum world — sculptured on curved surfaces, then observed by us in a 2D picture plane. A network of emptiness (little bangs) that reverberates as a mirrored envelope, reflecting our ingrained version of reality.

Opening night:
Sponsored by Gatch Wine
6pm, Friday, August 2, 2019
RSVP Malcolm +61 (0)419 864 987

Exhibition dates: 
August 1 — 11

Malcolm’s artist talk times:
Join me for an informal chat about the work — 
4pm, Sunday, August 4
4pm, Sunday, August 11

Venue: Little Bang Brewing
25 Henry Street, Stepney, South Australia
Thursday 4pm – 10pm
Friday 12pm – 10pm 
Saturday 12pm – 10pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

The ‘nothing’ tied to the cosmos!

Distinct and reciprocal cavities develop when mark making events are created on curved structures. So that when it is transformed to the flattened observed form, a truth about the human condition emerges – that we are tied to a 2D universe yet entangled in all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space. 

Here are a number of pieces that will go on display at my coming exhibition at Little Bang Brewing. Details to be confirmed.

Oil on JPP Synthetic, set off a blue-mirrored back panel with 12mm spacers.
Oil on JPP Synthetic, set off a gold-mirrored back panel with 12mm spacers.

One scorch mark tied to the cosmos

Scorched Echo Reflections, oil on JPP Synthetic, set off a blue-mirrored back panel with 12mm spacers, framed.

The aesthetic thought — use the membrane surface to create events in 3D curvature space (as a sculptor) then bring it back to the flat 2D picture plane for observation.

Echo Reflections

Oil on JPP Synthetic, set off a blue-mirrored back panel with 12mm spacers.

Just one of my pieces that may be exhibited at Little Bang Brewing’s new exhibition space. Details to come.

Preamble

In the 1950s and 1960s, Lucio Fontana gave us a new and radical concept of space. His gestural expressions of ’buchi and tagli’ (holes and cuts) called for a new art form that reflected and responded to the present-day’s understanding of space and time — he called this work ‘spatialism’. Especially with his sharp edge cutting of the canvas, for which he is famously known, he was able to show that you can extend the 2D object into a 3D conceptual one. His work created an image through the direct engagement of both the canvas’s physical properties and the space that exists around it. At no stage did he call what he was doing…painting. It was a ‘spatial concept’ with the objective of forcing us to think about the role of the surrounding space.

Today, as we try to grapple with our understanding of the cosmos, what I call ‘Quantum Brushstrokes’ aims to reflect our times but may in fact be an extension of Fontana’s idea. However, what distinguishes my work from his is that the mark-making events have been prominently created on curved structures. That is, all my works are structurally created in the 3 dimensional form before I bring them back to the two dimensional flat picture plane we now observe. So rather than the surface exposing time and space, I’m tying us to it. By creating reciprocal markings, distinct cavities develop, akin to an echo, that could not be achieved unless some sort of curvature construct was involved. 

So when you observe any of my works, even though the geometric conditions may have change form, you can never alter their uniqueness nor their fate to remain tied to the two dimensional reality of the picture plane. A truth about the human condition — that we are trapped on the edge of a 2D universe yet entangled in all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

Helium Sculpture

Distinct and reciprocal cavities develop when mark making events are created on curved structures. So that when it is transformed to the flattened observed form, a truth about the human condition emerges – that we are tied to a 2D universe yet entangled in all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

This double-sided framed sculpture will go on display at my coming exhibition at Little Bang Brewing (25 Henry Street, Stepney, South Australia). Details to be confirmed.

Aesthetic Poetry

My work is nothing more than mere expressions dancing on hollow nothingness; As the curved surface geometries changes form, you can never alter their uniqueness or their fate to remain tied to the two dimensional reality of the picture plane — a truth about the human condition — we are trapped on the edge of the universe yet entangled in all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

Yellow Helium Bloom is one of my paintings that will be exhibited at Little Bang Brewing‘s new premises in 2019. Further details to come.

Yellow Helium Bloom by Malcolm Koch, oil on JPP Synthetic, suspended with 12mm spacers off a blue-mirrored backing panel.

Close up of a ‘drill hole expression’. As the drill bit cut the surface it scolds the edges of the cavity. Leaving behind a mark that shows anti-clockwise spin and reverse side entry. The blue-mirrored panel below reflects back to the viewer the ‘nothingness’ that has been created.

Destruction and creation are bonded together through a series of mark-making events that have been achieved in three dimensional form. So when the expressions are ‘opened out’ and observed on the two dimensional picture plane, they create distinct and reciprocal cavities that confines us to the surface — setting in motion a further process of deep reflection or meditation.

 

Quantum Brushstrokes at Little Bang

I’m proud to announce that Little Bang Brewery will host my art once they’ve settled into their new premises in Stepney. The exhibition is likely to be in early 2019 and will feature a range of new work exploring what I call ‘Quantum Brushstrokes’. Further details to come.

Call Malcolm for details: +61 419 864 987

Painting or sculpture? See for yourself – Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™ finalists’ exhibition

I’m honoured to be selected as a finalist in the Open Category of the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™ 2018 for my piece ‘Oxygen Captured’.

This is the third time I have been selected as a finalist in this prestigious exhibition. My entry ‘Oxygen Captured’ represents a single oxygen atom. By representing this atom at a human scale, I hope it will highlight the precious qualities oxygen has for our existence. However, the below image is not the side you will see on display. It is intended as an insight into my ‘hole’ working method. Illustrating how I can work on both sides of the canvas as one ‘complete’ expression — an aesthetic I call Quantum Brushstrokes. And an Artistic Approach that I consider is neither painting nor sculpture.

Image showing the blueprint and working notes used to create this artwork. Front side is on display at Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize.

The reverse side of Oxygen Captured: The above image shows my working notes. Although this side is not on display, it illustrates my working method. An approach that I believe creates works of art that is neither a painting nor a sculpture. Front side is on display at the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™.

See for yourself — the front side will go on display, with all the other selected finalists’ works, at the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™ finalists’ exhibition, South Australian Museum from June 8 until August 5, 2018.

‘I’m re-imagining our universe — entangled in the void of spacetime; As the image transforms from the three dimensional to the two dimensional form, it emerges free to endlessly stretch out beyond the limits of the flattened picture plane.’

Oxygen Captured

Oxygen Captured: Presented side on display at the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™.

Malcolm’s Artistic Approach: Is it painting or sculpture?

Since 2004, I have been developing the idea that a different kind of aesthetic is created when events are deployed on a curved canvas rather than a flat ‘two dimensional’ plane. Marks created in this way take on the form of the geometric profile, so that when the results are re-stretched to the two dimensional picture plane, the aesthetic emerges. I call this approach Membrane Art  — as it is the curvature profile(s) of the surfaces that underpins the development of each artwork.

Like a sculptor who works in three dimensional space, this approach allows me to engage with all dimensions, space and surface, including both sides of the surface. However, unlike a sculptor, when ‘painting’ in this way surfaces are partially, or completely, obscured from my sight. Also, unlike painting directly onto a flat picture plane, the flexibility of the curved canvas surface allows for reciprocal marks to result that cannot be achieved on a flat surface. However, the key is always to return to the two dimensional picture plane as this generates the human visual experience.

Why paint in this way?

Recognising that the surface membrane creates the basic structure for the artwork is only the beginning. Results can either echo, connect and/or entangle themselves in ways that cannot be achieved in our flat dimensional world — yet, in the end, you never truly know what you’re going to be looking at until you unroll it. It shows that the markings have come from somewhere else — where expression and sculpture unite — which is why I consider this approach neither painting nor sculpture.

Creating a different kind of abstraction is born out of a need to ‘geometrically’ define our multi-dimensional universe. It shows a world that we cannot observe directly, yet we know it exists. So the meaning may appear latent but the premise and execution of the artwork is far from it. There certainly is a sense of freedom by working in this way. Creating a gestural response that is deeply-rooted in the present context of quantum physics yet not bound by its mathematical theorems, provides an artistic licence to explore.

MA#41: Highly Commended artwork at the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™

MA#41: My entry in the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™ 2014 finalists’ exhibition was Highly Commended. 

Membrane Art holds true — regardless of whether the events made on the surface are painted, sprayed, poured, drilled, slashed, stamped, cracked or any other kind of mark-making. It is the curved nature of the membrane surface that creates the structural expressions for the work and, provided the work is presented in a flattened two dimensional form for observation, it is a consequence of the aesthetic thought.

Similar to the way things may appear in nature at the atomic level, we may not fully comprehend the methods and sequences that allow it to appear the way it is but it seems to form part of our inherent reality.

Painting today needs possibilities, to go beyond a rehashed post-Minimalist or process-based ideas from the ’60s and ’70s, and discover a beauty that it can call its own.

Here is my Artist Statement that relates to my entry ‘Oxygen Captured’ in the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™.

The complex science surrounding the properties of a particle (ref. Atomic No.8) is fundamental to the formation of the conditions that promoted life on our oxygenated earth.

The constituent parts of an atom – protons, neutrons and electrons are represented by drill holes through a furled canvas (protons, neutrons) and sawn slashes (electrons). When the canvas is re-stretched to 2D form the drill holes and saw cuts create equidistant opposing “marks” within the white surface as in the inner vastness of atomic space.

The wave-like furling of the canvas, and the passage of drill and saw marks through it, when arranged in this fashion result in the kind of symmetry that is reminiscent of atomic structure and dynamic particle relationships that are the basis of all matter.

About the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™.

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize commemorates the birth of the South Australian Museum’s first curator, Frederick George Waterhouse. The biennial prize is an opportunity for artists to investigate the world around them, and present their perspectives on natural science. It encourages artists to make a statement about the scientific issues facing our planet, and offers a valuable platform for them to contribute to the environmental debate. Over the years the competition has become a much loved fixture on the arts calendar, allowing artists and audiences to explore natural science through a range of creative outlets. South Australian Museum – Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™.

Lithium-mesh_Malcolm_Koch_2016

Lithium Mesh: My entry in the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize™ 2016 finalists’ exhibition was Highly Commended.

More about Malcolm’s approach: Membrane Art: An evolving expression.

What started out as an investigation to find an authentic aesthetic manifestation of our natural world, particularly the way we observe it, has materialised into something more concrete, Membrane Art — a practice of allowing the surface geometry to play a part in creating distinctive expression and unfolding events.

The initial proposition was to fold, or undulate, a loose canvas (take it off the frame) and paint on it – then compress the depth by stretching the canvas back onto the frame (flat picture plane). The undulating membrane would provide a re-enactment of nature (containing multidimensional values). Something akin to the geology over glacial time frames that has determined configurations of landscape. The flat plane generates the human visual experience, a visual metaphor for how we perceive.

Events form and accumulate within the space over a period of time. Then by unfolding and recognising what happened it becomes an extension of ones cognitive ability to understand the geometric conditions and the state of materials that allowed such things to occur.

The discovery of this working practice showed him that he could transform the geometry of the canvas in its un-stretched form to the stretched. Furthermore, he realised that he didn’t just have to solely use the effects of gravity. With varying degrees of manipulation he could apply marks that either control paint flow, allow holes and cuts to be made (Quantum Brushstrokes discussion), or scrapings to form, or whatever action one chooses to apply. The actual membrane itself still underpins the aesthetics of each piece, although the degree of simplicity or complexity can be regulated and enhanced.

The impact of this work from the viewers experience is quite different. The viewer experiences the results of the work as a flat picture plane rather than an accrual of the method used. The aesthetic appreciation comes through the contemplation of each piece – setting in motion a further process of deep reflection or meditation.

For more information contact me or to see my artwork Oxygen Captured in the flesh, please take a visit to the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize finalists’ exhibition at the South Australian Museum from June 8 until August 5, 2018.

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Quantum brushstrokes

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About Membrane Art_2016

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Recovering ten years of ‘Membrane Art’.

Thanks to Jacqueline Mitchell from Art Logic, a rental and sales service supporting local South Australian artists, six paintings have come out of hibernations, and are now hanging in unison at BRI Ferrier’s boardroom (SA) for the next four months.

BRI Ferrier is a unique affiliation of expert business recovery, insolvency, forensic accounting and advisory firms. They provide practical, innovative services that help financially distressed businesses to recover or at least minimise the negative impacts of insolvency. They also support South Australian artists, like myself, through a continual program of art rental rotations that span over ten years.

This exhibition represents a variety of styles and approaches, dating back over ten years to when I first started experimenting with creating events on curves — an art practice I call ‘Membrane Art’.  This is my first time exhibiting with BRI Ferrier and I’m happy with the way it has come together.

The interrelation of art and science.

I’ve just visited a wonderful exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ballarat: Eugene von Guérard and rediscovered a name I’ve long forgotten about, the polymath, Alexander von Humboldt. 

Eugene von Guérard like many artist at the time was inspired by Humboldt’s view that art and science is one and the same. This is such a wonderful exhibition of Australia’s colonial past. So glad to have seen it and the rest of the gallery’s impressive collection of Australian iconic art. It’s on until May 27, 2018.

Art Gallery of Ballarat: Eugene von Guérard exhibition:

Chilled-out at 1414 Degrees.

Thanks to Jacqueline Mitchell at Art Logic , a rental (and sales) service supporting local South Australian artists, this painting (MA#5) is hanging in the Chairman’s office at 1414 Degrees for the next six months.

1414 Degrees’ is a thermal-based energy storage system. What makes it unique is that it is clean, scalable, sustainable and therefore unlike any other energy storage system in the world. This breakthrough technology is set to disrupt energy storage globally because it provides energy in the form most used in the world – heat. So, I’m thrilled that they’ve selected my work. Check out their recent prospectus and website: 1414 Degrees

Drill holes & saw cuts on curls & waves

The above sequence shows how drill holes and saw cuts are produced on curvature structures ( a variant of Membrane Art that I call Quantum Brushstrokes). Similar to the way a brushstroke mark is made on a flat plane – there is initial contact, movement across and then an exit off the surface. 

In 2004, I began experimenting with the idea that I could open up surfaces and spaces to countless more perceptual possibilities by painting on a curve rather than on a flat 2D plane. The events created on the curved surface would re-enact the ‘completeness’ of our natural world, and when the results are unraveled and revealed on the 2D picture plane it might generate the human visual experience, thus being a metaphor for how we observe. Since, this approach has enabled me to evolve and develop a body of work that I refer to as Membrane Art. The key influence and structural basis of my art practice.

The Quantum Wall

Although incomplete and requiring further explanation, these drafts are just for a bit of fun. I’m trying to illustrate an aesthetic interpretation of how fundamental particles may have evolved in ’empty spacetime’ not flat but as a curve. A kind of proto general relativity phase that results in a quantum blockage/wall developing. Making way for the right conditions to form elementary particles within the manifold.

In 2004, I began experimenting with the idea that I could open up surfaces and spaces to countless more perceptual possibilities by painting on a curve rather than on a flat 2D plane. The events created on the curved surface would re-enact the ‘completeness’ of our natural world (particularly at the atomic scale), and when the results are unraveled and revealed on the 2D picture plane it might generate the human visual experience, thus being a metaphor for how we observe.

Since, this approach has enabled me to evolve and develop a body of work that I refer to as Membrane Art. The key influence and structural basis of my art practice.

Paint pourings on fixed undulations

Top: side-on view, Middle: top view, Bottom: stretched-out view:
The above shows what has happened when paint was poured on a wavy surface. Gravity allows the paint to define the form as it flows from the top (point of contact) to either side of the surfaces until it hits the base below. The stretched-out view (bottom image) starts the process of compressing the depth to generate the human visual 2D experience.

 

Oxygen captured

‘I’m attempting to discover a universe; Concealed in the endless possibilities of 3D space, yet confined to a flat picture plane that reflects our inherent reality’. Malcolm Koch

Malcolm’s Artistic Approach: Is it painting or sculpture?

Since 2004, I have been developing the idea that a different kind of aesthetic is created when events are deployed on a curved canvas rather than a flat ‘two dimensional’ plane. Marks created in this way take on the form of the geometric profile, so that when the results are re-stretched to the two dimensional picture plane, the aesthetic emerges. I call this approach Membrane Art — as it is the curvature profile(s) of the surfaces that underpins the development of each artwork.

Like a sculptor who works in three dimensional space, this approach allows me to engage with all dimensions, space and surface, including both sides of the surface. However, unlike a sculptor, when ‘painting’ in this way surfaces are partially, or completely, obscured from my sight. Also, unlike painting directly onto a flat picture plane, the flexibility of the curved canvas surface allows for reciprocal marks to result that cannot be achieved on a flat surface. However, the key is always to return to the two dimensional picture plane as this generates the human visual experience.

Why paint in this way?

Recognising that the surface membrane creates the basic structure for the artwork is only the beginning. Results can either echo, connect and/or entangle themselves in ways that cannot be achieved in our flat dimensional world — yet, in the end, you never truly know what you’re going to be looking at until you unroll it. It shows that the markings have come from somewhere else — where expression and sculpture unite — which is why I consider this approach neither painting nor sculpture.

Creating a different kind of abstraction is born out of a need to sculpturally define our multi-dimensional universe. It shows a world that we cannot observe directly, yet we know it exists. So the meaning may appear latent but the premise and execution of the artwork is far from it. There certainly is a sense of freedom by working in this way. Creating a gestural response that is deeply-rooted in the present context of quantum physics yet not bound by its mathematical theorems, provides an artistic licence to explore.

Membrane Art holds true regardless of whether the events made on the surface are painted, sprayed, poured, drilled, slashed, stamped, cracked or any other kind of mark-making. It is the curved nature of the membrane surface that creates the structural expressions for the work and, provided the work is presented in a flattened two dimensional form for observation, it is a consequence of the aesthetic thought.

Similar to the way things may appear in nature at the atomic level, we may not fully comprehend the methods and sequences that allow it to appear the way it is but it seems to form part of our inherent reality.

Painting today needs possibilities, to go beyond a rehashed post-Minimalist or process-based ideas from the ‘60s and ‘70s, and discover a beauty that it can call its own.

Oxygen Captured image

Oxygen Captured by Malcolm Koch

Oxygen Captured by Malcolm Koch

Detail of Oxygen Captured by Malcolm Koch

Oxygen Captured by Malcolm Koch

On display – Oxygen Captured by Malcolm Koch

Quarks up and quarks down

Quantum brushstrokes exhibition
24 March — 23 April 2017

Tony Bond’s Gallery Space Upstairs
Edinburgh Castle Hotel
233 Currie Street, Adelaide
Mon-Fri 11am – 6pm
Sat 12pm – 6pm, Sun 1pm – 6pm

Artist talk times: Sunday 9, Sunday 23 at 4pm. Call Malcolm to confirm: 0419 864 987

Quantum brushstrokes exhibition

Art by Malcolm Koch
24 March — 23 April 2017

OPENING NIGHT: Thursday 30 March 2017
6pm—8pm

Tony Bond’s Gallery Space Upstairs
Edinburgh Castle Hotel
233 Currie Street, Adelaide
Mon-Fri 11am – 6pm
Sat 12pm – 6pm, Sun 1pm – 6pm

Call Malcolm to RSVP or for art talk times: 0419 864 987

Gustav Metzger’s legacy

Art like everything else repeats itself. So if we were to suppose that today we are about the cycle of 1960 (when the art market supposively went from strength to strength), then the question might be: What is the modern-day equivalent of Metzger’s ADA manifesto (an Absolute aesthetic idea) that can present a real alternative to the artworld of which he deplored? The answer may evolve through subcultures but it’s only throughAbsolute aesthetic ideas that provide the artist with a common philosophy or goal, so that he or she, or collective group, can bring about a sense of purpose and direction that may thrive once again outside the art market.

Metzger may not have achieved his ambition to smash the commercial gallery system. His legacy was his ability to inspire a collective consciousness in all things — an idea that I think still remains relevant today.

Gustav Metzger (10 April 1926 – 1 March 2017)

 

Network of quarks on blue

Experimental work on paper: The two trajectory paths of the strings followed a straight line in the curled up ‘complete space’ of when it was created. Now when we observe it on the 2D picture plane (human viewpoint) the strings appear to be networked differently. For more see Quantum brushstrokes

Quarks that spin ‘up or down’ — detail

Embossed quark hole showing the anti-clockwise spin direction of the membrane. Detail of Lithium mesh (bottom right – 1 of 3 holes).

Debossed quark hole showing the clockwise spin direction of the membrane. Detail of Lithium mesh (bottom right – 2 of 3 holes).

Embossed quark hole showing the anti-clockwise spin direction of the membrane. Detail of Lithium mesh (bottom right – 3 of 3 holes).

Lithium mesh: This painting/sculpture shows a number of drill holes and saw cuts. The bottom right set of 3 ‘quark’ holes (single quarks shown above) were all created at the same time or rather as one complete expression. Yet we may observe both ‘up and down’ qualities on the 2D picture plane. This is possible when the geometric state of the membrane is altered (curled) in a way to allow such events to occur before it is then unravelled to the 2D flat plane for observation – the principle idea behind Membrane Art. For more information see Quantum_Brushstrokes or Membrane Art.

Lithium mesh was highly commended at the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize, 2016. Synthetic polymer on JPP Synthetic, 566gsm, 1020w x 760h mm

 

Electron shower


Membrane Art holds true — Regardless of whether the events made on the surface are painted, sprayed, poured, drilled, sawed, stamped, cracked or any other kind of mark making, the curved nature of the membrane creates the structural expressions for the work — and provided the work is presented in a flattened 2D form for observation — it is a consequence of the aesthetic thought.

Holes (particles) created from curves

It is the curved nature of the membrane 
that creates the structural interpretations — and when the work is presented in a flattened 2D form for observation — the trajectory path appears to be different.

Curled phase
The trajectory path (broken line) of the drill hole follows a short and straight path in complete space (unseen).

Quantum_brushstroke_Curls_Malcolm-Koch_2016_2

Flattened phase
When the curl is unravelled, the trajectory path (broken line) remains the same as it was above. Yet the path seems longer, goes back in time and appears networked differently when we observe it from this (human) viewpoint.

Quantum_brushstroke_Flat_Malcolm-Koch_2016_2

Quantum_brushstroke_Flat_Malcolm-Koch_2016_3

‘I’m inclined to think that…the 3D world is an illusion. The ultimate precise reality is the 2D reality on the surface of the universe’, Leonard Susskin*

*Source: What is space? 48:30s, 2015 www.youtube.com
Note 1: The holes (3 white marks on the membrane surface) should be viewed as the vectors created within the field. They aren’t necessarily the particles themselves but the negative space that’s require for them to exist on the 2D surface.
Note 2: A second phase dimension has been neglected from these diagrams.

Working notes of ‘Lithium mesh’ (Spatial Lithium)

Lithium-mesh_notes-on-back_Malcolm Koch

The photograph above is of my working notes which appears on the reverse side of my ‘Highly Commended’ art piece, Lithium mesh. Although you will not see this side of it on display at the prestigious Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2016 exhibition – it shows my thoughts and the science of my working method. For more information about the science behind it, see the following blog (Proton brushstrokes) or download the PDF file Quantum brushstrokes

To see the finished mounted work, visit the South Australian Museum from 10 June until 31 July 2016. Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize_Gallery

Lithum-mesh_Malcolm_Koch_2016

Artist statement of work: Lithium mesh
Quarks & leptons are the building blocks of matter — I’ve created a series of events, using curls & waves, that interpret a geometric construct of a particle’s properties. The curved structures create a framework that allows for connections and entangled systems to manifest. Finally the surface is flattened to 2D-form for observation. The viewer experiences the unravelled results — challenging perceptions that things are often not what they appear to be — a tangible expression of how nature at the very small scale may be formed, by complicated structures and events that are concealed from us.

Proton brushstroke: from curvature to flat

Proton_Quantum_brushstroke_Malcolm-Koch_2016_2I’m inclined to think that… ‘the 3D world is an illusion. The ultimate precise reality is the 2D reality on the surface of the universe’, Leonard Susskin*

*Source: What is space? 48:30s, 2015 www.youtube.com
Note: A second phase dimension has been neglected from this diagram. Download the PDF file Quantum brushstrokes for more.

Quantum brushstrokes – Is it an open door for abstraction?

The Observer recently wrote a very interesting article titled, Are Painters out of ideas? In it they suggest that they are, ‘as it is just too difficult to be truly original with paint these days.’

Of course, ‘mimicry—either the naive or purposeful kind—is not new, nor is it illegal.’ But what caught my attention was the statement, ‘that there are only so many variants of color, brushstroke and composition to discover, especially once you get into formal abstraction. And in fact, the art world had seen an explosion of simplistic wall works over its recent boom years, many of which rehashed post-Minimalist or process-based ideas from the ’60s and ’70s in order to produce a high yield of nearly indistinguishable abstractions.’

While I essentially agree with the premise of this, I don’t agree that all has been explored. I believe what I call the ‘quantum brushstrokes’ opens a door to abstraction that is not borrowing, stealing, appropriating, or copying from the past. It is authentic, real and relevant to anyone, like me, who has a keen interested in expressing the aesthetics of our natural universe.

See full article here: http://observer.com/2016/02/are-painters-out-of-ideas/

For more download: Quantum brushstrokes

Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize – finalist and highly commended

Lithum-mesh_Malcolm_Koch_detail3

Lithium mesh (detail): A series of quantum brushstrokes.

For the second time running, I’m a finalist in the prestigious Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2016. Prize winners will be announced at the South Australian Museum at 10:30am on Thursday 9 June 2016. Whatever happens, I’m thrilled to be part of the exhibition to be held at the South Australian Museum from 10 June – 31 July 2016. For more info: http://www.waterhouse.samuseum.sa.gov.au/

More about Quantum brushstrokes